A Dead Language

TheCheshireChris

I'm just this guy, you know?

To expand on that, I am also the following...

- A former ficly member who is 38 years old and is schizoaffective (depressive type)

- Into creating languages and fantasy worlds from scratch

- A listener of audiobooks & good tunes

- Always too hard on myself


He aligned the glyphs in his head in a manner that he thought made sense. He drew them out onto a piece of paper and realized that they didn't.

He had been having trouble deciphering this language for months. Being the head of linguistics for the university that made the discovery it was bordering on embarrassing that he had yet to make any real progress.

They were calling it "Kalovay" and it originated in the Baltic region. Sadly the last person to speak it at any level of competence had died a year ago and of course, as with many languages teetering on extinction, nobody had the foresight to document it while there were still living speakers.

Brad knew he could crack it though. He had faith despite being an atheist. Faith in himself. Faith that the universe wouldn't let Kalovay die with that old man.

Too much knowledge was being lost in this day and age. Far too much Brad knew he had to do whatever he could to preserve this language, no matter how many sleepless nights it meant.

He wouldn't let it die.


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Comments (3 so far!)

Jim Stitzel

Jim Stitzel

Linguistics is such an interesting field of study. I sometimes wish I knew more about it because I really enjoy making up languages for fantasy races in many of my stories.

  • #2577 Posted 4 years ago
  • 0
TheCheshireChris

TheCheshireChris

If you're interested in creating languages I highly recommend Mark Rosenfelder's book "The Language Construction Kit"

  • #2579 Posted 4 years ago
  • 0
Jim Stitzel

Jim Stitzel

Excellent tip! Thanks!

  • #2580 Posted 4 years ago
  • 0

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